Posts Tagged : Commercial Real Estate Miami

CPAC & Lubert Adler Complete Repositioning of Royal University Plaza Shopping Center in Coral Springs

Alan Esquenazi and Warren Weiser

37,000-square-foot Orchard Supply store set to open in November

Eighteen months after acquiring Royal University Plaza in Coral Springs, Florida, owner CPAC Royal University, LLC, a joint venture between principals of CREC and Lubert Adler, has finalized a dramatic repositioning that more than doubled occupancy, added 15,000 square feet of rentable retail space, and lured high-profile anchors including Orchard Supply and Total Wine & More to the neighborhood shopping center.

Located at 2556 North University Drive, Royal University Plaza was an underperforming asset when CPAC and Lubert Adler purchased the property for $26 million in February 2015. At the time, the center was 45 percent occupied and in need of significant capital improvements that would help attract major national brands to the center situated at the high-volume intersection of University Drive and Royal Palm Boulevard.

Central to the JV ownership group’s turnaround was enlisting CREC to undertake an aggressive retail leasing and marketing campaign and oversee a series of capital improvements, including a 15,000-square-foot expansion that opened the door to a new 37,000-square-foot Orchard Supply store set to open in November – one of the brand’s first locations in South Florida.

“As we began evaluating the neighborhood following last year’s acquisition, we quickly identified a lack of available boxes capable of attracting junior anchors,” says Alan Esquenazi, a partner at CREC. “By reconfiguring storefronts and adding additional space, we transformed Royal University Plaza into a top-performing asset in the Coral Springs neighborhood within a year-and-a-half.”

Today, the 115,000-square-foot Royal University Plaza is 94 percent leased and home to a tenant roster that includes Total Wine & More, Pet Supermarket, Jimmy John’s, Third Federal Bank, Hertz Rental Cars, Brooklyn Water Bagel Co., and AAA Auto Club.

“Royal University Plaza is a classic example of a retail asset that benefitted from a creative approach to leasing, marketing and construction management,” explains CPAC Principal Warren Weiser. “We identified an underperforming property in a submarket that was home to strong demographics and CREC executed a strategy that maximized asset value and elevated the center’s appeal among some of the country’s hottest retail brands.”

20 Sports Authority Stores Up for Grabs in South Florida
Carla Vianna | Daily Business Review

About 20 locations from Miami to Jupiter will be up for grabs once the debt-laden sporting goods retailer closes its doors in bankruptcy. Averaging 40,000 square feet, the large stores threaten to inflate the market by nearly 1 million square feet when big-box retailers are physically downsizing.

A dwindling market for department stores makes finding a tenant for extra-large spaces more difficult than releasing boutique-size shops catering to lifestyle brands, said Gunster real estate attorney Brian Belt. The Miami shareholder said big-box stores sit on the market longer, which could hurt smaller tenants nearby that counted on the foot traffic generated by their bigger neighbor.

If landlords fail to attract a sizable retailer, the large spaces may be retooled into gyms or other uses that “don’t generate as much income,” Belt said.

When Sports Authority shuts its doors, hundreds of stores across the U.S. may go dark — and stay dark.

South Florida, however, is somewhat immune to the “retail apocalypse,” said Alan Esquenazi, a principal at CREC who has represented Sports Authority in the past.

Brokers are confident the retailer’s South Florida locations won’t sit vacant for long.

Esquenazi said Sports Authority “traditionally went for high-profile, great locations.”

These include the street-level store at the popular Shops at Midtown Miami and a spot at Dadeland Station in suburban Kendall. The bankrupt retailer also has a presence at Dolphin Mall and Sawgrass Mills.

Steven Henenfeld, CREC’s director of retail leasing, said the closings open prime sites for tenants looking to upgrade their position in the market and give landlords the opportunity to push up rents when a newcomer moves in.

“South Florida in general will fare better with respect to Sports Authority’s vacancies than a lot of other markets because our retail numbers are very, very strong,” Belt said.

Retail vacancies dropped to 3.2 percent in Miami-Dade County and 5.3 percent in Broward County during the first quarter, according to CBRE Inc.

A bankruptcy auction will be held June 29 for 320 of the chain’s 463 store leases, including 18 in South Florida totaling 715,000 square feet. New York-based A&G Realty Partners LLC will accept bids until June 23.

“After the June 29 date, we will have a better idea of what is going to be left available,” said CBRE senior vice president Paco Diaz.

Diaz said the top two contenders could be Dick’s Sporting Goods and Orchard Supply Hardware.

Lowe’s purchased Orchard Supply in 2013 and last year announced plans to add 40 stores, according to a retail report by Orlando-based Crossman & Co.

“Retailers at every end of the spectrum are reevaluating their footprints,” the report said. Healthy retailers are “exploring smaller stores to gain access to urban consumers where real estate costs can be prohibitive.”

While large department-store brands like Macy’s have struggled with underperforming assets — over the past five years the retailer closed 52 locations — discount retailers like Ross Stores Inc. boast healthy performances and could be viable contenders for Sports Authority’s defunct locations.

 

Does Sumitomo’s $220M Grab Point To More Big Office Buys?

Does Sumitomo’s $220M Grab Point To More Big Office Buys?

JUNE 9, 2016 | BY JENNIFER LECLAIRE

MIAMI—“The fact that the Miami Tower’s price doubled in less than decade is proof that the investor appetite for existing office space is driving property values to record levels.”

The sale price on the 631,672-square-foot office asset: $220 million.

MIAMI—The Japanese corporation Sumitomo recently paid $220 million for the iconic, light-changing Miami Tower in Downtown Miami. Call it the latest sign that the investor appetite for Miami’s commercial real estate market is still intensifying.

Domestic and international investor interest continues to drive property values to record levels. For example, the Miami Tower was last sold for $105 million five years ago. The sale price doubled in about five years.

“The fact that the Miami Tower’s price doubled in less than decade is proof that the investor appetite for existing office space is driving property values to record levels,” Ezra Katz, CEO of Aztec Group, tells GlobeSt.com. “As Miami’s booming condo market outbids office developers for available land, the amount of inventory is not keeping up with the rising demand for office space. We expect that office rents and sale prices will continue to rise as supply becomes more constrained and investor demand increases.”

The past year has seen a series of similar office deals, including the $140 million sale of 777 Brickell, the $112 million sale of 800 Brickell, and the $142 million sale of Espirito Santo Plaza, all trophy assets in Miami’s financial district.

Miami’s booming condo market has also impacted the ability of institutional investors and office developers to compete for land, since condo developers will outbid them every time. As a result, Miami’s office market is seeing steady rising rental rates and increased demand, but little new office inventory to meet the rising demand.

These market fundamentals point to the reasons why Sumitomo would pay top dollar for an office asset like Miami Tower, and all signs point to other office properties trading hands as deep-pocketed investors seek top-performing assets to add to their portfolios as market conditions continue to strengthen favoring landlords.

“Sumitomo’s pickup of Miami Tower is another example of an institutional buyer targeting a performing asset amidst high barriers to new office development across South Florida,” Warren Weiser, chairman of CREC, tells GlobeSt.com. “Building a stand-alone office tower from the ground-up in today’s market has become cost prohibitive just as demand for Miami real estatesoars. This is putting existing buildings benefitting from quality locations and strong income in-place at a premium.”

Coral Gables Sees Mega Deal; Largest of 2016

Coral Gables Sees Mega Deal; Largest Of 2016

MIAMI—The seller more than doubled its money in 11 years.

2121 Ponce includes a five-story, 586-space parking garage and street-level retail space.

MIAMI—It’s the largest commercial real estate transaction in Coral Gables, FL so far this year. A joint venture between Greenstreet Partners just sold the 2121 Ponce office building to a member company of Zurich North America for $57.5 million. Greenstreet acquired the building for 27.1 million in 2005.

Zurich Alternative Asset Management, Zurich’s alternative investment adviser, worked with the buyer on the deal. The sale of the 164,848 square-foot office building marks the latest sign of mounting demand for high-performing South Florida office properties among institutional investors around the world. CREC and CBRE brokered the deal.

“Coral Gables has long been one of South Florida’s most desirable submarkets, and that position will only grow as office users prioritize locations that are walkable and in close proximity to public transit options,” CREC principal Steven Hurwitz, who manages leasing at the building in tandem with CREC’s Doug Okun, tells GlobeSt.com. “2121 Ponce has emerged as one of the neighborhood’s best addresses over the past decade, particularly among companies in the market for space priced slightly below the rates at newer buildings nearby.”

CREC and Greenstreet acquired 2121 Ponce in 2015. Since then, the office asset has seen significant renovations of all common areas. A leasing and marketing program repositioned the building as a boutique, service-oriented option for Coral Gables office users. CREC has worked as the exclusive leasing agent and will continue managing the office asset for the new owner. The property is 95% occupied.

CREC’s Warren Weiser, Harry Blyden, and Andrew Remick co-brokered the sale of 2121 Ponce alongside CBRE’s Christian Lee, Jose Lobon, and Andrew Chilgren. Roy Rosenbaum, director of acquisitions, and Sean Bannon, managing director and head of US real estate, led the way for Zurich.

“Our experience at 2121 Ponce is an example of how a building’s value can be maximized by bringing a clear vision to life through creative leasing, construction, marketing and property management strategies,” says CREC chairman Weiser. “The investments we’ve made over the past decade have transformed the building into a core institutional-grade asset, leading to this sale. We expect similar acquisition activity in the coming months given high barriers to new development across South Florida.”

Located in the Coral Gables business district one block north of the “main and main” intersection of Ponce de Leon Boulevard and Alhambra Circle, 2121 Ponce includes a five-story, 586-space parking garage and street-level retail space. Goldstein Schechter, Fox Latin America, Valley National Bank, the Consulate of Barbados and CREC call the office building home. POC restaurant is located on the building’s ground floor.

The office property’s setting in Coral Gables’ walkable downtown is also appealing to tenants as the $21 million makeover of two of the neighborhood’s main retail thoroughfares, Miracle Mile and Giralda Avenue, gets underway. The submarket is home to more than 150 multinational corporations, more than a dozen luxury hotels, a free public trolley system, and boutiques and restaurants. Eighty-five new eateries opening in the last five years. Meanwhile, more than 1,500 residential units are expected to come online over the next three years.